Daguerreian Manoeuvres in the Dark | In Praise of BUNNKR

One of our favorite blogs, BUNKKR decided today to comite a digital suicide. We were surprised not only by they saying good bye, but also to discover that they have deleted all their old post.

We have learned a lot reading them during the whole past year and that’s why @laperiferia and @dpr_barcelona, in a combined action, want to make our own homage to their work. To do so, we have done a trip to their current dead web-site archive, where we extracted their best six post selected in a completely subjective way. Then we will post them simultaneously on our blogs, both in Spanish at La Periferia Doméstica and English, here.

We are still not sure of the result of this combined posting, is a kind of reflex action, an attempt to keep the blog alive. In the end it might only be a sort of digital daguerreotype, a post-mortem portrait similar to those that were so popular at the end of the XIX century.

Here is our selection:

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1. Frédéric Chaubin [As seen on facebook on 19 March at 16:59]


Source: New Urban Photography

Photographer Frédéric Chaubin recently published a book which includes 90 buildings sited in fourteen former Soviet Republics which express what he considers to be the fourth age of Soviet architecture. BUNKKR has shared with us a great selection of Chaubin poetic pictures on March 2010.

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2. Le Mur de L’Atlantique [As seen on facebook on 29 September 2010 at 20:56]


Source: Flores en el Ático

This post was an archive of abandoned defensive constructions from WWII, also known as The Atlantic Wall, register by Paul Virilio on his book Bunker Archeology and were referenced by BUNKKR on September 2010.

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3. MOBILE HOMES suicide de l’ordinaire [As seen on facebook on 15 December 2010 at 17:38]


LEFT: Mobile Home (Dusk), 1995; RIGHT: Mobile Home (Split-Level), 1995

Selection of best Peter Garfield’s “Mobile Home” photographs were published on BUNKKR on December 2010. The poetry behind each picture and the lightness that can be perceived through them, simply images of suburban houses flying through the sky, were published as part of a dream that goes beyond the traditional approach of the term “housing”.

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4. BELIEF IN THE AGE OF DISBELIEF Cyprien Gaillard [As seen on facebook on 27 October 2010 at 17:04]


Source: Stroom den Haag

In October 2010, BUNKKR dedicated one of their posts to the French artist Cyprien Gaillard. His œuvre is inspired on the Romanticism and is influenced by artists like Robert Smithson. The post referred to a series of engravings by Gaillard, where it can be seen a complete archive of buildings from the modern movement placed on bucolic landscape, transforming architecture in a kind of dream.

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5. NÉBULEUSE [As seen on facebook on 09 November 2010 at 18:24]


Source Guillaume Amat

On november 2010 BUNKKR made a selection on the series of photographs by Guillaume Amat chronicling abandoned WWII beach bunkers in Northern France and called Nébuleuse. Amat wrote on his web-site:

Nébuleuse
In April 2007, in a muffled silence, the sea disappeared, as if vanished, leaving behind only ghosts of stone. These Blockhaus, remains of World War II, slowly digested by the tides turned out to be threatening places of refuge in the middle of an unexplored desert.

The project called “Nébuleuse” [Nebula] is part of a reflection on the question of World War II heritage, the French coast and its conversation.

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6. ERIC TABUCHI [As seen on facebook on 22 October 2010 at 8:36]

The photographic series by Eric Tabuchi, always focused on the architectural object in a close relationship with the landscape, allude to a space that is degraded to disappear. This post was a clear reference to the nostalgic, the romantic ruin. BUNKKR posted it in October 2010, and after that, Abitare also took the reference to write this post about the artist.

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Instead of a portrait, we prefered to built this digital BUNKKR, a protected place constructed in order to save some contents while sharing them with some future visitors. For they to be surprised with some of the provocative contents we discovered through Maxime Bousquet’s restless mind and vision.

We would love to think that if, in a distant future, we decide to stop blogging here, someone could miss us just like we already are missing BUNKKR.


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